Mastering the Phone Interview

July 21, 2012

This article proved pretty good prior to my phone interview, but absolutely none of it proved useful to what I considered to be a really excellent phone interview – BY THE INTERVIEWER!

It’s curious that I was an undergrad with a great young fellow named Peter Vogt, also the name of this article’s author.

Mastering the Phone Interview

By Peter Vogt, Monster Senior Contributing Writer

 

You just got word that you landed a job interview with a company that really interests you — only there’s a slight catch.

You won’t be meeting with your interviewer(s) face to face. Instead, you’ll be taking part in a phone interview, the results of which will determine whether you’re invited to meet with company representatives in person.

Many companies use phone interviews as an initial employment screening technique for a variety of reasons. Because they’re generally brief, phone interviews save companies time. They also serve as a more realistic screening alternative for cases in which companies are considering out-of-town (or out-of-state and foreign) candidates.

So the chances are pretty good that, at some point in your job hunt, you’ll be asked to participate in a 20- to 30-minute phone interview with either one person or several people on the other end of the line. In many ways, the way you prepare for a phone interview isn’t all that different from the way you’d get ready for a face-to-face interview — save for a few slight additions to and modifications of your list of preparation tasks.

Here’s what to do:

  • Treat the phone interview seriously, just as you would a face-to-face interview.
  • Have your resume and cover letter in front of you.
  • Make a cheat sheet.
  • Get a high-quality phone.
  • Shower, groom and dress up (at least a little).
  • Stand up, or at least sit up straight at a table or desk. 

A phone interview seems so informal on the surface that it can be easy to fall into the trap of “phoning it in” — i.e., not preparing for it as well as you would for an in-person interview. Don’t get caught with your guard down. Be sure to research the company, study the job description, and practice your responses to anticipated questions, just as you would for any other interview.

You’ll almost certainly be asked about some of the information that appears on these documents. You might also want to have in front of you any supporting materials that relate to information in your resume and cover letter, like documents you’ve designed or written, a portfolio of your various projects, or the written position description from your key internship.

Jot down a few notes about the most critical points you want to make with your interviewer(s). Are there certain skills and experiences you want to emphasize? Do you have certain interests or passions you want your interviewer(s) to know about and understand? Be sure these pieces of information appear on your crib sheet. Then touch on them during the interview, even if your only chance to do so is at the end of the session when the interviewer asks you if you have any questions or anything to add.

This isn’t the time to use a cellphone that cuts in and out, or a cheaply made phone that makes it difficult for you and your interviewer(s) to hear and understand each other.

Odd advice? Perhaps. But focusing on your appearance, just as you would for a normal interview, will put you in the right frame of mind from a psychological standpoint. You won’t do as well in your phone interview if you’re lying in bed, for example, or if you’re draped over your couch in your pajamas.

Again, there’s a psychological, frame-of-mind aspect to consider here. But on a more tangible level, research has shown that you project yourself better when you’re standing up, and you’ll feel more knowledgeable and confident.

Phone interviews can be tricky, especially since you aren’t able to read your interviewers’ nonverbal cues like facial expressions and body language during the session — a big difference from the typical interview. But if you prepare well for your phone interview, you won’t need to read anyone’s nonverbals to gauge your performance. You’ll know for sure how you’ve done because you’ll be invited to a face-to-face interview, where you’ll have yet another opportunity to prove you’re the best person for the job.

 

Mastering Telephone Interviews

July 21, 2012

Mastering the Phone Interview

This article proved pretty good prior to my phone interview, but absolutely none of it proved useful to what I considered to be a really excellent phone interview – BY THE INTERVIEWER!

It’s curious that I was an undergrad with a great young fellow named Peter Vogt, also the name of this article’s author.

Mastering the Phone Interview

By Peter Vogt, Monster Senior Contributing Writer

You just got word that you landed a job interview with a company that really interests you — only there’s a slight catch.

You won’t be meeting with your interviewer(s) face to face. Instead, you’ll be taking part in a phone interview, the results of which will determine whether you’re invited to meet with company representatives in person.

Many companies use phone interviews as an initial employment screening technique for a variety of reasons. Because they’re generally brief, phone interviews save companies time. They also serve as a more realistic screening alternative for cases in which companies are considering out-of-town (or out-of-state and foreign) candidates.

So the chances are pretty good that, at some point in your job hunt, you’ll be asked to participate in a 20- to 30-minute phone interview with either one person or several people on the other end of the line. In many ways, the way you prepare for a phone interview isn’t all that different from the way you’d get ready for a face-to-face interview — save for a few slight additions to and modifications of your list of preparation tasks.

Here’s what to do:

  • Treat the phone interview seriously, just as you would a face-to-face interview.
  • Have your resume and cover letter in front of you.
  • Make a cheat sheet.
  • Get a high-quality phone.
  • Shower, groom and dress up (at least a little).
  • Stand up, or at least sit up straight at a table or desk. 

A phone interview seems so informal on the surface that it can be easy to fall into the trap of “phoning it in” — i.e., not preparing for it as well as you would for an in-person interview. Don’t get caught with your guard down. Be sure to research the company, study the job description, and practice your responses to anticipated questions, just as you would for any other interview.

You’ll almost certainly be asked about some of the information that appears on these documents. You might also want to have in front of you any supporting materials that relate to information in your resume and cover letter, like documents you’ve designed or written, a portfolio of your various projects, or the written position description from your key internship.

Jot down a few notes about the most critical points you want to make with your interviewer(s). Are there certain skills and experiences you want to emphasize? Do you have certain interests or passions you want your interviewer(s) to know about and understand? Be sure these pieces of information appear on your crib sheet. Then touch on them during the interview, even if your only chance to do so is at the end of the session when the interviewer asks you if you have any questions or anything to add.

This isn’t the time to use a cellphone that cuts in and out, or a cheaply made phone that makes it difficult for you and your interviewer(s) to hear and understand each other.

Odd advice? Perhaps. But focusing on your appearance, just as you would for a normal interview, will put you in the right frame of mind from a psychological standpoint. You won’t do as well in your phone interview if you’re lying in bed, for example, or if you’re draped over your couch in your pajamas.

Again, there’s a psychological, frame-of-mind aspect to consider here. But on a more tangible level, research has shown that you project yourself better when you’re standing up, and you’ll feel more knowledgeable and confident.

Phone interviews can be tricky, especially since you aren’t able to read your interviewers’ nonverbal cues like facial expressions and body language during the session — a big difference from the typical interview. But if you prepare well for your phone interview, you won’t need to read anyone’s nonverbals to gauge your performance. You’ll know for sure how you’ve done because you’ll be invited to a face-to-face interview, where you’ll have yet another opportunity to prove you’re the best person for the job.

 

Veganpalooza!

July 14, 2012

Veganpalooza!.

Exclude hot dogs and other obesity- and cancer-causing foods from photo ops that feature the president.

May 11, 2012

.WE PETITION THE OBAMA ADMINISTRATION TO:

Exclude hot dogs and other obesity- and cancer-causing foods from photo ops that feature the president.

The nonprofit Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine believes that food-related photo ops featuring the president, vice president, first family, or members of the cabinet routinely conflict with government health messages. The photos often present foods that contribute most strongly to cancer, obesity, and premature mortality in a favorable light. A typical photo op depicts a president entertaining a foreign dignitary, with both stuffing processed meats or hamburgers into their mouths for the assembled cameras. All recent presidents have been involved in such events. There is no justification for encouraging Americans to eat foods that will harm them and their children. Instead, photo ops that include food should portray government officials eating healthfully.

 

Created: May 09, 2012

Issues: Health Care

Jain Education International

January 30, 2012

I just finished drafting the Wikipedia page for the Jain Education International, which hosts the Jain eLibrary.

http://www.jainlibrary.org

Please visit and see how it can be improved.

From: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jain_Education_International

http://my.neavs.org/site/MessageViewer?em_id=3801.0

December 15, 2011

BOSTON, MA—(December 15, 2011)—The National Academy of Sciences’ Institute of Medicine (IOM) today released results of their nine-month long study, called for by the NIH, to investigate the current and future need for chimpanzees in research. The IOM concluded that ‘…most current biomedical research use of chimpanzees is not necessary.’ The only exception was their “inconclusive” decision (a 5-5 split) regarding a “narrow area” of hep C vaccine work.

Upon reading the report, Theodora Capaldo, EdD, president of NEAVS and its national campaign, Project R&R: Release and Restitution for Chimpanzees in U.S. Laboratories, stated, “This pivotal report is the first step toward ending all chimpanzee research in U.S. laboratories. The science guided the IOM to its conclusion that they are ‘not necessary’—a promising outcome for chimpanzees and better science for humans.”

Jarrod Bailey, PhD, geneticist and NEAVS/Project R&R Science Director noted,

“The IOM’s conclusions show understanding of the scientific and factual testimony provided. While the committee did not go far enough to endorse an ‘outright ban,’ it noted that, ‘the present trajectory of scientific research indicates a decreasing need for the use of chimpanzees.’ And, that ‘Past Use Fails to Predict Future Necessity.’ This is all encouraging and truly the beginning of the end of chimpanzee use.”

NEAVS/Project R&R believes that if the IOM’s recommended and restrictive criteria for proposals for new chimpanzee research are scrupulously applied, they will in fact end all chimpanzee use. Said Bailey, “It cannot be demonstrated that any chimpanzee research would meet all of these criteria. This criteria will de facto be an end to all invasive chimpanzee research.”

NEAVS/Project R&R’s team of chimpanzee experts includes Gloria Grow, Fauna Sanctuary founder. Grow, appointed co-chair of Project R&R, listened while the IOM webcast announced its results. When the webcast ended, she spoke about Tom, a Fauna chimpanzee who is named Project R&R’s Ambassador. Grow shared,

“I have always felt that the chimps who have died are watching over the others. Now, I believe that even more. I am so glad this news came this month—this very good news that is the beginning of the end and hope for the future of all those still in labs, including so many of our chimps’ family members. It is fitting that this falls at the anniversary time of Tom’s passing two years ago in December. I am happy for Tom and for all who will one day soon see justice done.” She added, “I am going to go now and tell the chimps.”

NEAVS/Project R&R deems the IOM report—along with other scientific, public and legislator support—as instrumental to passage of the Great Ape Protection and Cost Savings Act (H.R.1513/S.810), the bill now before Congress that will end the use of all great apes in invasive research and retire federally owned chimpanzees to sanctuary. Meanwhile, Tom remains forever close to us as the symbol of our mission.

From: http://my.neavs.org/site/MessageViewer?em_id=3801.0#.Tuo3OlUTslo.pingfm

Introducing HABRI Central: A New Resource for the Study of the Human-Animal Bond

November 20, 2011

HABRI Central: A New Resource for the Study of the Human-Animal Bond

From: http://habricentral.org/

Vegetarian Resource Center

November 4, 2011

“FAN” the Vegetarian Resource Center on Facebook

From: http://www.facebook.com/Vegetarian.Resource.Center

Vegetarian Food Festival in Roxbury growing in popularity – Roxbury – Your Town – Boston.com

October 27, 2011

Kimber said college students have stepped up as volunteers for the festival.

“The event is entirely volunteer-based, and the student community has been fantastic with providing support,” she said.

Admission to the festival is free, as is parking. Special tickets are available to purchase for $5, which will allow for an early-entry preview event on Saturday. More information can be found at: http://www.BostonVeg.org/foodfest.

From: http://www.boston.com/yourtown/news/roxbury/2011/10/vegetarian_food_festival_in_ro.html

Vegetarian Resource Center (8)

August 30, 2011

Founded in 1993, the Vegetarian Resource Center, led by Maynard S. Clark, innovates vegetarian culture building projects that transform vegetarian life and outreach. All who volunteer, support, are influenced by VRC, and share its mission of ‘making connections for plant-based diets’ are welcome.

From: http://www.facebook.com/Vegetarian.Resource.Center


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